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Clean trailing spaces

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Ekaitz Zárraga 3 years ago
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431c7ae365
  1. 36
      doc/hacking/overview.md

36
doc/hacking/overview.md

@ -37,10 +37,10 @@ file and stick with it. Note however that this won't apply to libraries.
Use good sense
--------------
> Le bon sens est la chose du monde la mieux partagée; car
> Le bon sens est la chose du monde la mieux partagée; car
> chacun pense en être si bien pourvu, que ceux même qui sont les
> plus difficiles à contenter en toute autre chose n’ont point coutume
> d’en désirer plus qu’ils en ont.
> d’en désirer plus qu’ils en ont.
>
> -- [René Descartes], [Discours de la méthode]
@ -87,10 +87,10 @@ The conventions I try to honor are:
}
switch(v){
case AnOption:
case AnOption:
...
break;
case AnotherOption:
case AnotherOption:
...
break;
default:
@ -110,26 +110,26 @@ The conventions I try to honor are:
}
```
5. Use one space around `=` `+` `-` `<` `>` `*` `/` `%`
5. Use one space around `=` `+` `-` `<` `>` `*` `/` `%`
`|` `&` `^` `<=` `>=` `==` `!=` `?` `:`, but no space between
unary operators (`&` `*` `+` `-` `~` `!` `sizeof` `typeof`
`alignof` `__attribute__` `defined` `++` `--`) and their
`alignof` `__attribute__` `defined` `++` `--`) and their
operand, and obviously no space around the `.` and `->` structure
member operators
6. Use short names in local variables and module functions when the
meaning is obvious in the context using them (`tmp`, `i`, `j`).
meaning is obvious in the context using them (`tmp`, `i`, `j`).
7. Use descriptive names for globally visible functions and variables
(eg `proc_segment_detach`). In Jehanne's kernel a few frequently
used global variables are allowed to violate this rule:
used global variables are allowed to violate this rule:
`up` (current user process), `m` (current processor) and `sys`.
8. Use `typedefs` for struct and enums (CamelCase) but not for pointers.
9. Functions should be short, do one thing, hold few local variables
and `goto` a centralized cleanup section on error.
Keep in mind errors when designing the return values of your functions.
Keep in mind errors when designing the return values of your functions.
Use Plan9's `error()` machinery only in functions directly called by
other modules (like `Dev` methods and exported ones), not just
to easily unroll the stack.
@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ environment with `./hacking/devshell.sh` that will start a new Bash:
`devshell.sh` also gives you an hook to customize your development
environment without touching the repository: if the
`$JEHANNE_DEVELOPER_DIR` (default: `~/.jehanne/`) exists and contains
`$JEHANNE_DEVELOPER_DIR` (default: `~/.jehanne/`) exists and contains
a script named `devshell.sh`, such script will be sourced.
For example my own `devshell.sh` starts a couple of terminals.
@ -219,14 +219,14 @@ to day testing is done with Qemu.
To run the system in Qemu you can run:
`./hacking/runOver9P.sh`
: that connects a 9P2000 server running on the linux host
: that connects a 9P2000 server running on the linux host
to mount `$JEHANNE` as the root file system
`./hacking/runDisk.sh [path/to/disk/image]`
: that uses the disk image
provided (or `$DISK`) to as the root file system
`./hacking/QA.sh`
`./hacking/QA.sh`
: used by `runqemu` to start the workhorse or to execute the QA checks
(it should not be executed directly).
@ -245,13 +245,13 @@ These scripts react to a few environment variables:
: number of simmetric processors to use
Qemu will multiplex the terminal I/O between Jehanne's serial console
and Qemu monitor. To switch between the two use `Ctrl-a x`.
and Qemu monitor. To switch between the two use `Ctrl-a x`.
To stop Qemu use `Ctrl-a c`.
To create or update a bootable usb stick (or a disk image to be used
with Bochs or Qemu) you can use:
`./hacking/disk-create.sh`
`./hacking/disk-create.sh`
: creates a raw disk image at `$DISK`
(default `./hacking/sample-disk.img`). It uses syslinux, its bios
files (looked up at `$SYSLINUXBIOS`) and fdisk, but it can be run as
@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ Debugging
---------
Once you get used to the codebase, debugging Jehanne is pretty simple.
First start the system in Qemu with either `./hacking/runOver9P.sh` or
First start the system in Qemu with either `./hacking/runOver9P.sh` or
`./hacking/runDisk.sh`. If `$KAPPEND` contains the string "waitgdb",
Jehanne will stop at an early stage after the boot and will wait for a
gdb connection.
@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ another hook to ease your debug as you like.
If `$JEHANNE_GDB_LOGS` is defined the whole session will be logged there,
prepended with the current commit hash and a brief summary of the
repository status.
repository status.
The workhorse
-------------
@ -330,7 +330,7 @@ Custom Go tools
Here is a brief summary of the other custom tools in
`./hacking/src/jehanne/cmd/`:
`runqemu`
`runqemu`
: runs Jehanne in a qemu instance and send commands to it.
It is used both during compilation (to create the initial ram disk,
for example) and to run [quality checks].

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